Western-Cape-High-Court If you’re black‚ female and ready to change the world one law at a time‚ the Legal Resources Centre and the Cape Bar have got R100‚000 for you. The two organisations announced on Thursday that they have launched a scholarship in memory of Arthur Chaskalson‚ the first chief justice in the democratic era.
Legal Resources Centre and the Cape Bar have a R100‚000 scholarship
Legal Resources Centre and the Cape Bar have a R100‚000 scholarship
                  The Arthur Chaskalson Pupillage Fellowship will be awarded annually to a would-be advocate — or advocates — admitted for pupillage‚ or formal training‚ at the Cape Bar. “The fellowship will be awarded to an excellent candidate committed to the achievement of a just society and realising the vision of the constitution‚” said Cape Bar spokesman Claire Martens. “Only historically disadvantaged candidates will be considered and female candidates will be preferred in accordance with the LRC’s commitment to transformation of the legal profession.” Fellowship recipients will be paid R100‚000 during the year of pupillage. “Following completion of pupillage‚ the pupil will take up a position as junior counsel in the LRC’s constitutional litigation unit in Cape Town‚ subject to the availability of a position and funds‚ for a period of at least two years‚ whereafter the advocate may return to the Bar to pursue private practice.” Chaskalson was admitted to the Johannesburg Bar in 1956. In 1963 he joined the defence team led by Bram Fischer in the Rivonia Trial of Nelson Mandela and nine others. In 1978 he founded the LRC with Geoff Budlender and Felicia Kentridge. It became one of the most important public interest law organisations in South Africa. Chaskalson was president of the Constitutional Court from 1994 to 2001 and chief justice from 2001 to 2005. “He was passionately committed to the development and use of the law as a means of achieving justice‚” said Martens. “He believed this could be achieved by giving effect to the rights in our constitution‚ by opening up access to justice‚ and through the independence of the judiciary and the legal profession.” SOURCE: DAILYDISPATCH

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